Category Archives: Coronation

Coronation – lessons from, Part IV

David’s coronation as king of all Israel had four stages.  He established the covenant under God; He seized Jerusalem as his capital; He enjoyed personal prominence; He defended Israel against foreign enemies.

Today, Additional Lessons We Can Learn.  First, in David’s reign God established a king, a kingdom and a city, all symbolic of his everlasting rule.  David foreshadowed the Christ; his kingdom the church; and the New Jerusalem, the eternal home of God’s people.  So much for those who think the past has nothing to teach us; and certainly has no future use.

Second, the value of preparation in serving God.  For at least ten years David had anticipated his coronation.  He had sometimes been close enough to feel himself crowned; and sometimes so far away it seemed never to come.

But it did, as God planned.  Think of it:  he came to full authority at a time when age had matured his views, but long before it robbed him of the energy necessary to implement them.  God had worked it out, through the bad times and good; through dreary days in the desert strongholds; through delays and setbacks.  God can always be trusted.  If he has only one speed—His—that deliberate speed never fails to fulfill his purpose.  And if the Master’s Return is delayed, let God’s work with David assure us that its very delay guarantees its eventuality!

Third, God always establishes a visible evidence of his Presence.  James Garfield once defined a university as educator Mark Hopkins sitting on one end of a log with a student at the other.  David defined the kingdom of God as GOD ALMIGHTY the teacher and himself the Student.  The church isn’t quite like that.  It starts with individuals committing to Jesus, who then become part of a group of people called a church.  Jesus is the head of that Body.  As we can’t have a body without a HEAD, we can’t see Jesus as a HEAD without his BODY!

Fourth, God’s provision in every crisis.  God didn’t give Jerusalem to David.  He had to TAKE it.  He didn’t give it.  He had to EARN it.  The only thing God GIVES is GRACE that forgives our sins.  Everything afterwards as disciples is earned by effort.  Let us thank God we can’t earn forgiveness.  But let us also devote ourselves to doing the good works God from the first intended us to do Ephesians 2:10.

Here again we perversely reverse it.  We want to EARN our way to God—hoping our good deeds will surpass our sins.  But we aren’t interested in being fruitful disciples.  We want to do what God alone can to save us.  We don’t want to do what we must to be Christians.  How perverse even believers are.

A closing thought:  As Roman historian Tacitus wrote, “Defeat in battle starts always with the eyes.”  Germania, p. 137.  Thus, the old saying is true:  when facing a challenge, whether we think we CAN, or think we CAN’T, we’re probably right.  But David never saw a challenge he considered beyond God’s control.  His coronation brought a new, vigorous spiritual energy to Israel.  The birth of Jesus re-activated it in himself.  He continues to fuel his people with immeasurable success if we continue in faithful service.   Fini

 

Check out my E-books and website at:  www.smashwords.com/profile/view/virgh; www.uglydogpro.com           

Books at:  www.createspace.com.  (Go to search, dropdown to store, Virg Hurley.) 

Apologetics book:  Their Own Best Defense, Volume 2, Part 1

Books also at www.amazon.com  (Virgil Hurley & Virg Hurley)

New books:

      The Parables of Jesus at www.createspace.com/7164741

     Gift of the GIVER:Gifts for the GIVER, Vol. 2 at www.createspace.com/7551153

     Their Own Best Defense, Vol. 2, Part 2 at www.createspace.com/7446349

Coronation – lessons from, Part III

David’s coronation as king of Israel proceeded in three stages.  One, he ruled all twelve tribes.  Two, he conquered Jerusalem as his capital.  Stage three, It Brought Him Personal Prominence.

First, in having a palace built.  David began receiving emissaries from other kings, with their congratulations and good wishes.  Hiram, King of Tyre, proved his interest in David’s reign by sending men and material to build a palace of cedar and stone.  Such attention fortified David’s awareness of God’s benefaction.  He understood it as a sign of his permanence in Israel and of Israel’s exaltation in God’s eyes.

Second, in additional marriages.  Every inch an oriental king in this regard, David lamentably felt important in direct proportion to the number of wives possessed—despite God’s earlier warnings not to multiply wives Deuteronomy 17:17.  The marriages strengthened his political base in Israel and the Middle East.  While it cost David only a ballooning food bill, such marriages wreaked moral disaster on Solomon.

Teaching us a valuable lesson.  What one person can have as a habit and remain close to God, another finds the same habit leading him from God.  Which means:  Christians need to establish before family and friends only positive, godly models of behavior.  That leaves an example God wants to communicate generation to generation.  If they fall from that behavior, it’s despite a good model being set, not because a bad one has been set.

The fourth stage:  He Successfully Defended Israel Against Foreign Enemies.

No sooner had David been crowned than an aggressive Philistia mobilized its entire army, marched to the Valley of Rephaim looking for him, intending to humiliate him.  They didn’t understand David spiritual capacity.  Unlike Saul, whose terror increased as Philistine armies enlarged, David calmly massed troops in his mountain fortress waiting God’s permission to use them.  He sought two answers from God:  should he attack the Philistines?  Yes.  Would he defeat them?  Yes.

David referred to the rout at Baal Perazim as the pounding of waters on an earthen dam until irresistible force collapsed the whole structure, sweeping everything before it.  The Philistines even left their idols on the field.

Unconvinced, Phlistia again marshaled troops and, as before, spread out in the Valley of Rephaim, perhaps stationing cavalry or charioteers in the critical center, where Israelite warriors had penetrated.  David again consulted the Lord.  Should he fight them?  Yes.  But not head-on, as before.  Accordingly, David left enough troops to convince Philistia’s commanders of a frontal assault, then marched the rest around the enemy flank.  There they awaited God’s presence:  the sound of marching in the dense leaves of balsam trees.  When it came, curling the leaves, revealing white undersides, forward they moved, a half-mile-wide screaming column, pounding the unprotected enemy rear, punching holes, preventing reorganization, routing the whole army.  And as nothing is more devastating to an army than an unexpected attack in its rear, Philistia’s army fled in panic, David’s men in close and devastating pursuit.  End Part III

 

Check out my E-books and website at:  www.smashwords.com/profile/view/virgh; www.uglydogpro.com           

Books at:  www.createspace.com.  (Go to search, dropdown to store, Virg Hurley.) 

 Apologetics book:  Their Own Best Defense, Volume 2, Part 1

 Books also at www.amazon.com  (Virgil Hurley & Virg Hurley)

 New books:

      The Parables of Jesus at www.createspace.com/7164741

      Gift of the GIVER:Gifts for the GIVER, Vol. 2 at www.createspace.com/7551153

      Their Own Best Defense, Vol. 2, Part 2 at www.createspace.com/7446349

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Coronation – lessons from, Part II

Stage One of David’s coronation as king of all Israel Established a Covenant Under God.  Stage Two Secured Jerusalem as His Capital.

Situated farther south than David preferred, Hebron also lacked the security Jerusalem offered.  Jerusalem crowned its high plateau; offered a panoramic view of surrounding country; occupied powerful defensive works overlooking sheer cliffs.  David wanted it.  Besides, a thousand years before God chose it by leading Abraham to Mt. Moriah, something like nearly 700 yards north, where Solomon built his Temple.

David had a problem, however.  Once briefly occupied by Judah, Jerusalem had for centuries been a Jebusite stronghold.  Confident in their inaccessibility, they claimed that even the blind and lame could defend the city.

So, the Jebusites held what David wanted and didn’t intend to surrender it.  That’s what’s called a challenge:  We’ve got it; We’re keeping it; You can’t have it.

That didn’t concern David.  He had long been accustomed to facing challenges as a shepherd, where he periodically encountered lions and bears that raided his fold.  He chased them and, in bare-handed fighting, killed them.  The confidence gained against animals strengthened him when facing Goliath.  The catcalls from Jerusalem’s heights only deepened his resolve to take it.

That teaches two spiritual lessons.  First, value any small conquest of any small foe, problem or temptation.  Never stop overcoming them.  They get us in the habit of conquest, whatever size of challenge faced.

Second, remember that those who take the longest to prepare often lead the longest with the greatest results.  David never imagined that shepherding a few sheep in the desert would prepare him to lead God’s people into a Kingdom that would never end.  Yet, in David’s reign God established the kingdom of which we’re members to this very day!  And which will continue eternally.

Longer story short:  David promised command of the army to the first man up the precipitous watercourse into the city—the lightly-guarded precipice considered suicidal for attackers.  Joab, first in a host of warriors whose “faces were the faces of lions,” who were “swift as gazelles in the mountains,” I Chronicles 12:8, led the charge.  Mission accomplished. On those 12 acres David established his residence and renamed it the City of David.   End Part II

 

Check out my E-books and website at:  www.smashwords.com/profile/view/virgh; www.uglydogpro.com           

Books at:  www.createspace.com.  (Go to search, dropdown to store, Virg Hurley.) 

Apologetics book:  Their Own Best Defense, Volume 2, Part 1

Books also at www.amazon.com  (Virgil Hurley & Virg Hurley)

New books:

      The Parables of Jesus at www.createspace.com/7164741

     Gift of the GIVER:Gifts for the GIVER, Vol. 2 at www.createspace.com/7551153

     Their Own Best Defense, Vol. 2, Part 2 at www.createspace.com/7446349

 

 

 

 

 

Coronation – lessons from, Part I

In the Modoc Indian War, Captain Jack led his people against white encroachment on their land.  Finally taken from the lava beds in which he had taken refuge, Captain Jack was hanged.  In previous discussion with white commissioners he asked if the Indian killers of white settlers would be tried by white or red men.  “White,” the commissioner replied.  Well, then, would white killers of Modocs be tried by Modcos?  No, by the whites, the commissioner replied, because the white man’s law ruled the country and there could be only one law at a time.

Thus, in Israel, Saul was dead, Jonathan was dead, Abner, was dead, Ish-Bosheth was dead.  Of that leadership corps, only David survived.  Which was good for Israel since only one king can reign at a time.  Jonathan’s death removed a potentially-explosive problem for David; Ish-Bosheth’s death removed only a minor annoyance.  But both were necessary to provide David with a level field on which his formidable leadership skills could build a dynasty.

The coronation developed in four stages.  Stage One, Establishing a Covenant Under God.  David made it with him and Israel before the Lord.  Appreciate the phrase before the Lord.  It meant that God would be Israel’s leader and David merely a surrogate under God’s control.  God’s word would be taught as their basic belief, with David the first to know it.   God’s word would rule, with David the first to obey it.  God’s word would be the definitive influence in the land among all classes, with David the one most emphatically influenced!

No wonder joy erupted in the coronation.  For the first time since Samuel died—and Saul had marginalized his influence years before—a godly man ruled the land.     End Part I

 

Check out my E-books and website at:  www.smashwords.com/profile/view/virgh; www.uglydogpro

 Books at:  www.createspace.com.  (Go to search, dropdown to store, Virg Hurley.) 

 Apologetics book:  Their Own Best Defense, Volume 2, Part 1

 Books also at www.amazon.com  (Virgil Hurley & Virg Hurley)

 New books:

      The Parables of Jesus at www.createspace.com/7164741

      Gift of the GIVER:Gifts for the GIVER, Vol. 2 at www.createspace.com/7551153

      Their Own Best Defense, Vol. 2, Part 2 at www.createspace.com/7446349